The Nurturing Power and Musicality of our Singing Voice

Sunday 19th June 2016
Julie Wylie

Four-year-old Isobel sings to her baby brother in exactly the same loving way that her parents have always sung to her.

When we sing to our babies and young children we instinctively share our feelings of love, playfulness, our joint experiences and emotions. Singing is mutually enjoyable for parent and child. We might think we are not musical, but parents everywhere have to realize that their singing voice is the most important in the world for their child.  You sing a question, your baby answers with musical expression.  These singing games at bath time, changing time, cuddle time are building strong emotional bonds of connection. All the elements of music are incorporated in singing, listening waiting, filling in the gaps. These interactive musical moments are building the foundation for musical behavior.

Notice how all the elements of music are incorporated in this beautiful film footage of big sister Isobel singing to her little brother Reuben. She is using loving touch in her massage song, rhythmic patterning, beat and repetition. She sings the increasingly higher notes of the body pitch song as she sings up the five-note scale. Her facial expressions are highly expressive and exaggerated. She uses loud and soft (dynamic variation) expression and musical form.

Notice too how Reuben is listening, watching intently and taking turns with his big sister, singing his little musical offerings. This very loving musical exchange has come about because their parents have regularly played music games with them.  Isobel is able to play so lovingly and musically with her little brother precisely because she is imitating how her parents have always played with her.  Sister and baby brother are forming strong emotional bonds of love because they impact hugely on the infant’s ‘visual, vocal, and kinetic signals. Such interactive musical play contributes to healthy and optimal growth through the early years. It lays the foundation for healthy brain growth and development, brain/body connections, musical play, positive relating, timing, warm sympathetic interactions with others, mental health and well-being.

References: 

Dissanayeke,  E. (2008). If music is the food of love, what about survival and reproductive processes? Musicae Scientiae, Special issue, 169-195.

Wylie, J.C. (1996, 2000). ‘Body Pitch Song ‘ p.96.  Music, Learning, and Your Child.  Canterbury University Press.  Christchurch. New Zealand.

 


Testimonials

 Thank you very much to offer a wonderful music workshop for Chinese ECE educators in Auckland. We have learnt so much music teaching ideas for babies, toddlers, over 3 and special needs children. Most importantly, we learnt the ways that how you communicate and interact with children at different age groups in the music activities. I was hoping I could be a professional ECE music teacher like you and help many young children to build their musicality at the beginning of their life.

非常感谢Julie Wylie能为我们奥克兰华人幼教老师带来这场精彩的幼儿早教音乐培训课。在您的课堂上,我们学到了如何与不同年龄组的小朋友交流,并开展音乐活动。作为我个人来讲,我希望我也能成为向您一样的优秀的早教音乐教师。我希望在我的教育职业生涯中,通过我的努力,能帮助更多的小朋友在少儿时期对音乐产生兴趣,并在幼儿园里学习到基础的音乐知识与技能。

Yona Yang Li, Scribbles Early Education Centre (Auckland)
Recent Facebook posts

Julie Wylie and team are working with children and teachers in the Woolston Early Learning programme as a part of earthquake..

5 likes, 0 comments8 hours ago

Love Grows Brains | Wright Family Foundation

Are you familiar with the Wright Family Foundation’s message Love Grows Brains? The Love Grows Brains launch was held recently..

22 likes, 0 comments1 day ago

Siblings bonding through Musical Play “This little piggy went to market” Do you know any good musical games young siblings..

8 likes, 0 comments3 days ago

Like us on Facebook