REFLECTIONS ABOUT MUSICAL PLAY WITH THE CHILDREN FROM JAMES ST by Sarah Marra

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It was wonderful to see the children in both the nursery and preschool become really settled in their music routines today. They are familiar with our routines – coming to the same place, starting with the Hello song, twinkle twinkle and finishing with “music time has finished” and Ka Kite.

We have intentionally repeated some of our songs from last week to encourage learning in a familiar environment. This week I noticed a wonderful amount of singing coming from the children. They were happy to sing along with the melody and form of the songs that we had practiced previously and are now beginning to incorporate movement and dance too.

We have been working on body awareness with our body pitch songs in all of our sessions. As the developmental ages increase throughout the morning so do our pitch songs. The nursery is focusing on labelling body parts, the 2-3 year olds are now including counting up to 5 with accurate understanding of body in relation to pitch, and our 4 year olds are now including counting up to 8 and back down again.

The rakau sticks have been a wonderful exploration of hand eye coordination for all ages. The children have been encouraged to offer ideas and we have supported their offerings in song. As the routine has become more familiar we notice more children willing to share their ideas during their music time.

This morning we also encouraged the children in team work, supporting each other – this was shown in simply taking a partner for ‘row row row your boat’ in the nursery, or more complexly in the preschool with sharing their partner’s rakau to create shapes.

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Springtime Rhythm

DAF, DAF, DAFF-O-DIL

daffodil

 

In our music classes we use a variety of found objects such as shells, stones, flowers to set out a simple rhythmic pattern. The children can help to arrange the patterns which we chant, clap, pat and dance.

For a springtime pattern arrange Daffodils to form the Pattern : Daf, Daf, Daf- O- Dill.

Then let your children take the lead and see what patterns they come up. Have fun!


Shell, Shell, Little Shell

Shell, Shell, Little Shell

ELSIE REMEMBERED THE SHELL PATTERN WE USED FOR RHYTHMIC NOTATION. THE CHILDREN HELPED TO ARRANGE SHELLS ON  THE FLOOR TO FORM RHYTHMIC PATTERNS.

shell

In our music classes we use a variety of found objects such as shells, stones, flowers to set out a simple rhythmic pattern. The children can help to arrange the patterns which we chant, clap, pat and dance.

Elsie used to come to my music class until the first term of this year when the family moved to Nelson. Two year old Elsie remembered us setting out shells on the floor for the rhythmic pattern shell, shell, little shell. When her dance teacher used this same rhythmic pattern, Elsie insisted that the class had to used the shell chant ” Because that is what we did in Julie Wylie Music.” We would reinforce this pattern through movement: Walk, walk, running walk.  

FOR A SPRINGTIME PATTERN ARRANGE DAFFODILS TO FORM THE PATTERN: DAF, DAF, DAFF-O-DIL

daffodil